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The Fourth Way

  1.   North America
  2.   Public
The Fourth Way transcends assimilation, resignation, and conflict by building partnerships with all nations and peoples. The Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) was established in 1982, at t... The Fourth Way transcends assimilation, resignation, and conflict by building partnerships with all nations and peoples.

The Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) was established in 1982, at the University of Lethbridge, by Indigenous elders, spiritual leaders and community members from across Canada and the US.

FWII is an internationally recognized leader in holistic human, community, organizational and economic development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development. During the past 36 years FWII has worked extensively with Indigenous Peoples across the Americas and SE Asia.

The past four years a primary focus of FWII’S North American work is stopping the Alberta Tar Sands through supporting direct action, innovative social media approaches and actualizing International Treaties between Indigenous Nations. These efforts include: The International to Protect the Sacred from Tar Sands Projects, the International Treaty to Protect the Salish Sea and the Nawt-sa-maat Alliance.

In June, 2013, FWII officially opened the Four Worlds Foundation (FWF) at the City of Knowledge, Panama City, Panama. FWF serves as an international organizing and educational Hub for actualizing the Reunion of the Condor, Quetzal, and Eagle via the Fourth Way across the Americas and beyond! This unification effort, initiated in 1970 in Bolivia, was crystallized at the 5th Indigenous Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama in April, 2015, held in parallel with the 7th Summit of the Americas.

Operation Underground Railroad

  1.   Inspirational
  2.   Public
Operation Underground Railroad (O.U.R.) is a non-profit founded by Tim Ballard which assists governments around the world in the rescue of human trafficking and sex trafficking victims, with a special... Operation Underground Railroad (O.U.R.) is a non-profit founded by Tim Ballard which assists governments around the world in the rescue of human trafficking and sex trafficking victims, with a special focus on children. O.U.R. also aids with planning, prevention, capture, and prosecution of offenders, and works with partner organizations for prevention, victim recovery, strengthened awareness, and fundraising efforts. The organization has been documented for their covert operations with jump teams consisting of former CIA agents, U.S. Special Operations Forces Members, and other support volunteers. Operation Underground Railroad's ultimate goal is to eliminate Sex Trafficking world-wide. As of April 2016, Operation Underground Railroad reports 529 victims rescued, and 182 traffickers arrested.

Bhukh Mukt Bachpan

  1.   Inspirational
  2.   Public
Mission Bhukh Mukt Bachpan saves the lives of severely malnourished children while helping vulnerable communities become self-sufficient. We started this initiative 6 months back to help these commun... Mission
Bhukh Mukt Bachpan saves the lives of severely malnourished children while helping vulnerable communities become self-sufficient. We started this initiative 6 months back to help these communities by feeding 100% nutritious and good quality food, spreading awareness towards cleanliness, inspiring them to get a better education, providing basic first add box and providing clean water for people in need.

Vision
- Feeding 100% nutritious and good quality food to needy vulnerable community children.
- Bring clean water to communities.
- Spreading awareness about cleanliness.
- First add box, Basic medicines for vulnerable community/ families.

Initial Goals
- Feeding 200 Children per month .
- Bring clean water to at least 30 Families per month ( One water camper per day for a family)
- Providing basic medicines, first aid box to at least 30 families per month.
- Inspiring 30 Families to provide primary education to their children.

The dream of making sure that no one sleeps hungry each night can be achieved if many such campaigns are running in the country. Let's start with ONE! We need your help in this mission. Vande Matram.

Unity Earth

  1.   Australia
  2.   Public
Indigenous leaders from across the globe will converge in Byron Bay for the first ever Fields of Healing on November 24th and 25th. Presented by Unity Earth, this historic family-friendly gathering wi... Indigenous leaders from across the globe will converge in Byron Bay for the first ever Fields of Healing on November 24th and 25th. Presented by Unity Earth, this historic family-friendly gathering will be a powerful celebration of cultural diversity and unity through music, art, workshops, performance, ecological healing and much more! https://fieldsofhealing.com.au/about/

Nation of Hawaiʻi

  1.   Nations
  2.   Public
Nation of Hawaiʻi (organization) The Nation State of Hawaii is an independent and sovereign group of Kanaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians),

Aloha Coin

  1.   Oceania
  2.   Public
Aloha Coin is not just another digital/cryptocurrency.​ It is the official currency of the Nation of Hawai'i, which is led by Dennis Pu‘uhonua "Bumpy" Kanahele. Kanahele has emerged as the leader of t... Aloha Coin is not just another digital/cryptocurrency.​ It is the official currency of the Nation of Hawai'i, which is led by Dennis Pu‘uhonua "Bumpy" Kanahele. Kanahele has emerged as the leader of the Hawaiian sovereignty movement and has been involved in hearings by the U.S. Department of the Interior over the question of whether the U.S. federal government should begin a process that could lead to a government-to-government relationship with a future Native Hawaiian government. As a step towards independence Kanahele has been advocating the need for an independent currency and has created Aloha Coin.

UNIFY

  1.   America
  2.   Public
Find a unifying event in your area or Nation.

ClearEnergy

  1.   Business
  2.   Public
Helping to enable self-reliance through independent power.

Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa is a Māori iwi of New Zealand.

Ngāti Pāhauwera

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
This rohe map represents the area over which Ngāti Pāhauwera exercises kaitiakitanga for the purposes of the Resource Management Act 1991 and is based on the Core Area of Interest agreed between Ngāti... This rohe map represents the area over which Ngāti Pāhauwera exercises kaitiakitanga for the purposes of the Resource Management Act 1991 and is based on the Core Area of Interest agreed between Ngāti Pāhauwera and the Crown in the Deed of Settlement signed on 17 December 2010.

Te Patukirikiri

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Te Patukirikiri is a Māori iwi of the Hauraki area of New Zealand. Radio station Nga Iwi FM broadcasts for Te Patukirikiri, Marutūahu from the iwi of Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Rongoū, Ngāti Whanaunga, ... Te Patukirikiri is a Māori iwi of the Hauraki area of New Zealand.

Radio station Nga Iwi FM broadcasts for Te Patukirikiri, Marutūahu from the iwi of Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Rongoū, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Maru and Ngāti Pāoa, and other Hauraki residents from Ngāti Hako, Ngāti Huarere, Ngāti Hei, Ngāi Tai, Ngāti Pūkenga and Ngāti Rāhiri. It was set up Paeroa on 9 March 1990 to cover local events and promote Māori language. It expanded its reach to the Coromandel Peninsula, Hauraki Gulf and Huntly in mid-1991.[4] The station is available on 92.2 FM on Coromandel Peninsula, 99.5 FM in Paeroa, and 92.4 FM across the Hauraki Plains to Miranda and Huntly.

Te Kawerau ā Maki

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Kawerau a Maki, Te Kawerau-ā-Maki or Te Kawerau is a Māori iwi from the Auckland Region of New Zealand Te Kawerau ā Maki as a distinct tribe descend from the rangatira Maki wh... Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Kawerau a Maki, Te Kawerau-ā-Maki or Te Kawerau is a Māori iwi from the Auckland Region of New Zealand

Te Kawerau ā Maki as a distinct tribe descend from the rangatira Maki who conquered much of Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland) in the early 1600s. The iwi is named after Maki and his wife Rotu's son Tawhiakiterangi, also named Te Kawerau ā Maki. Te Kawerau people trace their ancestry from a number of ancestral waka (canoes) including the Aotea, Tokomaru, Kahuitara, Kurahaupo, and particularly the Tainui. Through this ancestry Maki and his people were connected to a number of earlier groups that settled in the Auckland region including Ngāti Awa and the wider Tainui descent group then known as Ngāoho who had occupied the region since the fourteenth century. Tainui ancestors including Hoturoa and the tohunga Rakataura (Hape) are particularly important in Te Kawerau whakapapa, as is the ancient Turehu ancestor and tohunga Tiriwa.

Although their rohe or area of customary interest includes the southern Kaipara, Mahurangi, North Shore, Auckland Isthmus, and Hauraki Gulf islands such as Tiritiri Matangi, Te Kawerau ā Maki are particularly associated with west Auckland (formerly Waitakere City), which is known traditionally as Hikurangi. The Waitakere Ranges and the huge forest that once covered much of Hikurangi are known by the traditional name Te Wao nui a Tiriwa— the great forest of Tiriwa. The many peaks extending down the Waitakere Ranges from Muriwai to the Manukau Harbour entrance became known as Ngā Rau Pou a Maki, or the many posts of Maki.

In September 2015 the Te Kawerau ā Maki Claims Settlement Act was passed into legislation. This Act records the acknowledgements and apology given by the Crown to Te Kawerau ā Maki and gives effect to provisions of the deed of settlement that settles the historical Treaty of Waitangi claims of Te Kawerau ā Maki.

In late 2017 Te Kawerau ā Maki issued a rāhui (ban) on people entering the Waitakere Ranges, in order to help slow the spread of kauri die-back disease.

Te Kawerau ā Maki were the official host iwi in 2018 for Auckland Council's annual Matariki Festival. As part of this, amongst other activities, they organised the festival's official dawn ceremony launch at the Arataki Visitor Centre, a sound and light display on the Auckland Harbour Bridge, and an exhibition of their history at Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery.

Ngāti Tama ki Te Upoko o Te Ika

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Tama is a historic Māori iwi of present-day New Zealand which whakapapas back to Tama Ariki, the chief navigator on the Tokomaru waka. The Iwi of Ngati Tama is located in north Taranaki around P... Ngāti Tama is a historic Māori iwi of present-day New Zealand which whakapapas back to Tama Ariki, the chief navigator on the Tokomaru waka. The Iwi of Ngati Tama is located in north Taranaki around Poutama. On its northern boundary (Mohakatino River) are the Tainui and Waikato/Maniapoto tribes, and on the southern boundary is Ngati Mutunga. The close geographical proximity of Tainui's Ngati Toa (of Kawhia) and Ngati Mutunga explains the long, continuous, and close relationship among the three Iwi.

History

Ngati Tama people migrated south in the 1820s in search of better opportunities (e.g., trade), to ensure their safety (e.g., there was the ongoing threat from musket-carrying Tainui war parties), and close whakapapa and historic ties with Ngati Toa (the main migrant group heading south to Te Whanganui-a-Tara - now Wellington). Ngati Tama's paramount chief Te Puoho was in charge of leading the expedition south, along with other chiefs, e.g., Te Kaeaea.

While Ngati Tama was one of the first Taranaki iwi to arrive in Wellington in the 1820s, other Iwi, hapu and whanau joined the migration from Taranaki e.g., Ngati Mutunga, and Te Atiawa. People from these three Iwi have in common the same heritage back to the Tokomaru waka. The central and southern Taranaki tribes, including Wanganui also participated in the journey south.

The evidence suggests that Ngati Tama arrived in Whanganui-a-Tara in a series of migrations from Taranaki (along with Te Atiawa, and led by Ngati Toa) in 1822, participating in a process of invasion and conquest and occupation of the environs of Wellington by 1824. They encountered the Iwi who were already settled in Te Whanganui-a-Tara, including Ngai Tara, Ngati Ira, and Ngati Kahungunu.

While Ngati Toa, and the Taranaki iwi, hapu, whanau had shared intersecting rights throughout the environs of Wellington, Ngati Tama maintained a separate and distinct identity in various places in Wellington. Ngati Tama places of residence on the harbour included Kaiwharawhara, Pakuao and Raurimu from the first arrival in 1824, Tiakiwai (Thorndon) after the departure of Ngati Mutunga (in 1835).

Ngati Tama settlements were established at Ohariu, Makara, Ohaua and Oterongo on the western coast; and Komangarautawhiri further north. Ngati Tama also had summer fishing kainga at Okiwi and Mukamuka (Palliser Bay).

The rights and customary interests of Ngati Tama included all interests and all rights in Te Whanganui-a-Tara and the lands and resources of those places, in particular westward to the coast. Ngati Tama were joint tangata whenua, and had tino rangatiratanga, mana whenua and tangata whenua status over those lands in accordance with traditional Maori law and custom. They exerted such status by their mana, rangatiratanga, by creating relations between groups, or by physical use, cultivation and occupation.

Ngati Tama maintained a separate and distinct identity in Wellington and enjoyed occupation, fishing, birding, and cultivation rights there. Ngati Tama also set up a functioning organisational structure, including hapu and whanau units, with associated kainga, marae, waahi tapu, etc.

Despite the pressures of competing interests among the iwi of Wellington, initially, a thriving economy developed that was largely based on servicing visiting ships in particular. However, some people had lost their lives in the journey south (e.g., Te Taku). In November 1835 after a series of beach front hui which discussed the possible invasion of Samoa and Norfolk Island, many took part in the invasion by sea of the Chatham Islands which were closer. Together with Ngati Mutunga, they captured the mate of The Lord Rodney and threatened to kill him unless they were taken to the Chatham Islands. after they reached the islands, the tribes took part in a slaughter of about 300 Moriori, raping many women, enslaving the survivors, and destroying the Moriori economy and way of life. Some returned home to Taranaki.

Ngāti Ruanui

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Ruanui is a Māori iwi traditionally based in the Taranaki region of New Zealand. In the 2006 census, 7,035 people claimed affiliation to the iwi. However, most members now live outside the tradi... Ngāti Ruanui is a Māori iwi traditionally based in the Taranaki region of New Zealand. In the 2006 census, 7,035 people claimed affiliation to the iwi. However, most members now live outside the traditional areas of the iwi.

History

Ruanui is acknowledged as the eponymous ancestor of the iwi. He was the son of Uenuku-puanake and Tāneroroa. Uenuku came from the Tākitimu canoe (although this is contested among Matauranga Maori historians), while Tāneroroa was the daughter of Turi, who came to New Zealand on the Aotea canoe. Turi originally landed in Aotea Harbour, but eventually settled along the Pātea River. Over time, Ruanui’s descendants spread across south Taranaki.

Ngāti Ruanui was heavily involved in tribal wars during the 19th century. In 1816, the iwi was invaded from the north by Nga Puhi warriors carrying muskets. Over the next few decades, Ngati Ruanui would come under attack by Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Whātua and the Waikato tribes. Ngāti Ruanui had no defence against the invaders armed with muskets, and many Ngāti Ruanui people were captured as slaves. Others were simply displaced by continuing warfare.

Even amidst tribal warfare, Ngāti Ruanui managed to build a successful society. Agriculture provided a stable economy. Ngāti Ruanui workers were employed as labourers in New Plymouth. Education and Christianity were eagerly embraced.

Ngāti Ruanui were wary of European settlers and their desire for more land. In 1860, when Te Āti Awa engaged in battle with the British Crown, Ngāti Ruanui sent fighters to support them. In retaliation, in 1865 and 1866 Crown troops invaded south Taranaki, destroying fortifications and villages. In 1868, notable resistance was provided by the tribal leader Tītokowaru against Crown troops approaching from the south. Amongst New Plymouth settlers the iwi was known as 'Ngati Ruin-Ruin Us' for the effectiveness of their attacks. But within a few years, Ngāti Ruanui had lost most of its land, displacing more Māori from their traditional lands.

Ngāti Rāhiri Tumutumu

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Rāhiri Tumutumu is a Māori iwi of New Zealand, named after the eponymous ancestor Rāhiri. They live at Te Aroha in the Hauraki District.

Ngāti Tarāwhai

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Tarāwhai is a Māori iwi of the Rotorua area of New Zealand. Te Arawa FM is the radio station of Te Arawa iwi. It was established in the early 1980s and became a charitable entity in November ... Ngāti Tarāwhai is a Māori iwi of the Rotorua area of New Zealand.

Te Arawa FM is the radio station of Te Arawa iwi. It was established in the early 1980s and became a charitable entity in November 1990. The station underwent a major transformation in 1993, becoming Whanau FM. One of the station's frequencies was taken over by Mai FM in 1998; the other became Pumanawa FM before later reverting to Te Arawa FM. It is available on 89.0 FM in Rotorua.


Ngāti Toa

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Toarangatira or Ngāti Toa Rangatira, is a Māori iwi (tribe) in the lower North Island and upper South Island of New Zealand. Its rohe (tribal area) extends from Whanganui in the north... Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Toarangatira or Ngāti Toa Rangatira, is a Māori iwi (tribe) in the lower North Island and upper South Island of New Zealand. Its rohe (tribal area) extends from Whanganui in the north, Palmerston North in the east, and Kaikoura and Hokitika in the south. Ngāti Toa remains a small iwi with a population of only about 4500 (NZ Census 2001). It has four marae: Takapūwāhia and Hongoeka in Porirua, and Whakatū and Wairau in the north of the South Island. Ngāti Toa's governing body has the name Te Rūnanga o Toa Rangatira.

The iwi traces its descent from the eponymous ancestor Toarangatira. Ngāti Toa originally lived on the coastal west Waikato region until forced out by conflict with other Tainui iwi headed by Pōtatau Te Wherowhero (later the first Māori King). Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Rārua and Ngāti Koata led by Te Rauparaha, escaped south and invaded Taranaki and the Wellington regions together with three North Taranaki iwi, Te Āti Awa, Ngāti Tama and Ngāti Mutunga. Together they fought with and conquered the turangawaewae of Wellington, the Ngati Ira, wiping out their existence as an independent iwi. After the 1820s the Ngāti Toa conquered region extended from Miria-te-kakara at Rangitikei to Wellington, and across Cook Strait to Wairau and Nelson.

History

Tupahau, a descendant of Hoturoa, the captain of the Tainui canoe, received warning of an imminent attack by Tamure, a priest of Tainui, and at once organised a plan of defence and attack. Tamure had an army of 2000 warriors whereas Tupahau had only 300. Tupahau and his followers won the battle, however Tupahau spared Tamure's life. Tamure responded to this by saying, Tēnā koe Tupahau, te toa rangatira! meaning "Hail Tupahau the chivalrous warrior!" (toa meaning "brave man" or "champion" and rangatira meaning "gallant", "grand", "admirable" or "chiefly").

Later, Tupahau's daughter-in-law bore a son who received the name "Toarangatira" to commemorate both this event and the subsequent peace made between Tamure and Tupahau. Ngāti Toa trace their descent from Toarangatira.

Te Rauparaha

Parekowhatu of Ngāti Raukawa, the wife of Werawera of Ngāti Toa, gave birth to Te Rauparaha in about the 1760s. According to tribal tradition the birth took place at Pātangata near Kāwhia. Te Rauparaha became the foremost chief of Ngāti Toa, credited with leading Ngāti Toa forces against the Waikato and Ngāti Maniapoto iwi and then, after his defeat, with piloting the migration to, and the conquest and settlement of, the Cook Strait region in the 1820s. Later he crossed Cook Strait to attack the Rangitane people in the Wairau valley. His attempt to conquer the southern South Island iwi was thwarted by an outbreak of measles which killed many of his warriors.

Te Rauparaha signed the Treaty of Waitangi twice in May and June 1840: first at Kapiti Island and then again at Wairau. Te Rauparaha resisted European settlement in those areas which he claimed he had not sold. Later disputes occurred over Porirua and the Hutt Valley. But the major clash came in 1843 when Te Rauparaha and his nephew Te Rangihaeata tried to prevent the survey of lands in the Wairau plains. These lands had been claimed by the New Zealand Company "on two grounds – alleged purchase by Captain Blenkinsop, master of a Sydney whaler in 1831-2; and the negotiations between their principal agent (Colonel Wakefield) and Rauparaha, the head of this tribe, in 1839". Te Rauparaha burnt down a whare which contained survey equipment. The Nelson magistrate ordered his arrest and deputised a number of citizens as police. Te Rauparaha resisted arrest and fighting broke out, resulting in the death of Te Rongo, the wife of Te Rangihaeata. Te Rangihaeata, who was known as a savage warrior, then killed the survey-party, who had surrendered, to avenge his wife's death in an act of utu. This became known as the Wairau Affray or until modern times, the Wairau massacre, as most of the Europeans were killed after the fighting had stopped.



Ngāti Ruapani

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Ruapani is a Māori iwi of northern Hawke's Bay and the southern Gisborne District in New Zealand. They take their name from the ancestor Ruapani, who lived at the Popoia pā on the Waipaoa River ... Ngāti Ruapani is a Māori iwi of northern Hawke's Bay and the southern Gisborne District in New Zealand. They take their name from the ancestor Ruapani, who lived at the Popoia pā on the Waipaoa River near Waituhi in the 15th and 16th century. The main centre for the tribe is now the Lake Waikaremoana area.

Ngāti Tūtekohe was an iwi of the Gisborne District in New Zealand, who took their name from Tutekohi, a descendant of Ruapani.

Ngāti Tama (Te Waipounamu/South Island)

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Tama is a historic Māori iwi of present-day New Zealand which whakapapas back to Tama Ariki, the chief navigator on the Tokomaru waka. The Iwi of Ngati Tama is located in north Taranaki around P... Ngāti Tama is a historic Māori iwi of present-day New Zealand which whakapapas back to Tama Ariki, the chief navigator on the Tokomaru waka. The Iwi of Ngati Tama is located in north Taranaki around Poutama. On its northern boundary (Mohakatino River) are the Tainui and Waikato/Maniapoto tribes, and on the southern boundary is Ngati Mutunga. The close geographical proximity of Tainui's Ngati Toa (of Kawhia) and Ngati Mutunga explains the long, continuous, and close relationship among the three Iwi.

History

Ngati Tama people migrated south in the 1820s in search of better opportunities (e.g., trade), to ensure their safety (e.g., there was the ongoing threat from musket-carrying Tainui war parties), and close whakapapa and historic ties with Ngati Toa (the main migrant group heading south to Te Whanganui-a-Tara - now Wellington). Ngati Tama's paramount chief Te Puoho was in charge of leading the expedition south, along with other chiefs, e.g., Te Kaeaea.

While Ngati Tama was one of the first Taranaki iwi to arrive in Wellington in the 1820s, other Iwi, hapu and whanau joined the migration from Taranaki e.g., Ngati Mutunga, and Te Atiawa. People from these three Iwi have in common the same heritage back to the Tokomaru waka. The central and southern Taranaki tribes, including Wanganui also participated in the journey south.

The evidence suggests that Ngati Tama arrived in Whanganui-a-Tara in a series of migrations from Taranaki (along with Te Atiawa, and led by Ngati Toa) in 1822, participating in a process of invasion and conquest and occupation of the environs of Wellington by 1824. They encountered the Iwi who were already settled in Te Whanganui-a-Tara, including Ngai Tara, Ngati Ira, and Ngati Kahungunu.

While Ngati Toa, and the Taranaki iwi, hapu, whanau had shared intersecting rights throughout the environs of Wellington, Ngati Tama maintained a separate and distinct identity in various places in Wellington. Ngati Tama places of residence on the harbour included Kaiwharawhara, Pakuao and Raurimu from the first arrival in 1824, Tiakiwai (Thorndon) after the departure of Ngati Mutunga (in 1835).

Ngati Tama settlements were established at Ohariu, Makara, Ohaua and Oterongo on the western coast; and Komangarautawhiri further north. Ngati Tama also had summer fishing kainga at Okiwi and Mukamuka (Palliser Bay).

The rights and customary interests of Ngati Tama included all interests and all rights in Te Whanganui-a-Tara and the lands and resources of those places, in particular westward to the coast. Ngati Tama were joint tangata whenua, and had tino rangatiratanga, mana whenua and tangata whenua status over those lands in accordance with traditional Maori law and custom. They exerted such status by their mana, rangatiratanga, by creating relations between groups, or by physical use, cultivation and occupation.

Ngati Tama maintained a separate and distinct identity in Wellington and enjoyed occupation, fishing, birding, and cultivation rights there. Ngati Tama also set up a functioning organisational structure, including hapu and whanau units, with associated kainga, marae, waahi tapu, etc.

Despite the pressures of competing interests among the iwi of Wellington, initially, a thriving economy developed that was largely based on servicing visiting ships in particular. However, some people had lost their lives in the journey south (e.g., Te Taku). In November 1835 after a series of beach front hui which discussed the possible invasion of Samoa and Norfolk Island, many took part in the invasion by sea of the Chatham Islands which were closer. Together with Ngati Mutunga, they captured the mate of The Lord Rodney and threatened to kill him unless they were taken to the Chatham Islands. after they reached the islands, the tribes took part in a slaughter of about 300 Moriori, raping many women, enslaving the survivors, and destroying the Moriori economy and way of life. Some returned home to Taranaki.

In 1835, 24 generations after the Moriori chief Nunuku had forbidden war, Moriori welcomed about 900 people from two Māori tribes, Ngāti Mutunga and Ngāti Tama. Originally from Taranaki on New Zealand’s North Island, they had voyaged from Wellington on an overcrowded European vessel, the Rodney. They arrived severely weakened, but were nursed back to health by their Moriori hosts. However, they soon revealed hostile intentions and embarked on a reign of terror.

Stunned, the Moriori called a council of 1,000 men at Te Awapātiki to debate their response. The younger men were keen to repel the invaders and argued that although they had not fought for many centuries, they outnumbered the newcomers two to one and were a strong people. But the elders argued that Nunuku’s Law was a sacred covenant with their gods and could not be broken. The consequences for Moriori were devastating.

Although the total number of Moriori first slaughtered was said to be around 300, hundreds more were enslaved by the invading tribes and later died. Some were killed by their captors. Others, horrified by the desecration of their beliefs, died of kongenge or despair. According to records made by elders, 1,561 Moriori died between 1835 and 1863, when they were released from slavery. Many succumbed to diseases introduced by Europeans, but large numbers died at the hands of Ngāti Mutunga and Ngāti Tama. In 1862 only 101 remained. When the last known full-blooded Moriori died in 1933, many thought this marked the extinction of a race.

In the late 1830s, the New Zealand Company brought into Te Whanganui-a-Tara boatloads of European colonisers in search of a place to settle. The effects on the Ngati Tama of the European settlers, who competed for resources, was to prove disastrous as the new arrivals sought Maori land.

The Port Nicholson Deed was a land sale transaction between the New Zealand Company and chiefs in the Hutt Valley, with the Ngati Tama Chief Te Kaeaea participating. The New Zealand Company thought they had purchased land from Te Kaeaea, but they had only been given anchorage and port rights to Wellington harbour.

The Crown set up the Spain Commission to enquire into the Wellington land sales. Spain came to adopt an attitude towards Ngati Tama claims, which ultimately came to seriously prejudice their interests because of Ngati Tama's actions in occupying land in the Hutt. While Spain noted the numerous faults inherent in the land sales, his findings incorrectly assumed that Te Kaeaea's participation in the Port Nicholson transaction was equal to complete comprehension of, and support for, the sale of Ngati Tama land. Despite the protestations from Ngati Tama people, the Crown assisted the settlers by making grants of Ngati Tama lands. The impact of Crown action in Whanganui-a-Tara was fatal; Ngati Tama lost the land they had conquered in 1822.

In 1844 Governor Fitzroy adopted a policy of compensating Ngati Tama. There was no consultation, and compensation proceeded in a summary fashion. Ngati Tama living in Kaiwharawhara received their share of the compensation under protest, and Ngati Tama living in Ohariu missed out on any payment at all.

In 1847, McCleverty concluded a series of agreements with Ngati Tama to finally settle the reserves issue. In total the 200 Ngati Tama received 2600 acres of reserves. These reserves (about 13 acres per person) were set aside as compensation. Whatever reserves had been awarded was inadequate for their needs. The reserves were also unsuitable for cultivation, and crops had been integral to their survival.

By 1842, the Ngati Tama people were forcibly removed from their lands by Crown-assisted settler occupation. They sought refuge by squatting on land in the Hutt Valley where the land was more productive than the reserve land they had been awarded. But this was short-lived; the Hutt occupation ended in February 1846, when Governor Grey evicted Ngati Tama under the threat of military intervention. Ngati Tama's cultivated areas, their sole means of survival, were plundered. The Ngati Tama chief, Te Kaeaea was exiled in Auckland. The remaining Ngati Tama people had to seek sanctuary with other Iwi and hapu in Wellington or elsewhere, suffered high levels of sickness and mortality, and had to sell reserve land out of necessity. When the Crown had finished its land acquisition programme, Ngati Tama had virtually no land left. By the 1870s Ngati Tama had largely moved from the harbour rim and had been evicted.

The impact on Ngati Tama was significant. Ngati Tama people had been scattered by the invasion of the Waikato tribes during the musket wars of the 1820s. Many then left Wellington which they had invaded and conquered, to take part in the seaborne invasion of the Chatham Islands. Some individuals survived, many in whanau groupings, living with other Iwi and hapu. But there was an absence of a contemporary, organised formal Ngati Tama Iwi presence in Wellington. Ngati Tama's land base and visible identity in Wellington as local Iwi was lost.

In the absence of an organised entity representing Ngati Tama in Wellington, other Iwi such as Ngati Toa and Te Atiawa took responsibility for looking after Ngati Tama interests. In particular, the Wellington Tenths Trust has directly represented the interests of its beneficiaries, namely those individuals and their descendents who were named as owners in Ngati Tama reserves in the Wellington region in the 19th century.

Ngāti Rangiteaorere

  1.   Tribes
  2.   Public
Ngāti Rangiteaorere is a Māori iwi of New Zealand. Te Arawa FM is the radio station of Te Arawa iwi. It was established in the early 1980s and became a charitable entity in November 1990.[3] The st... Ngāti Rangiteaorere is a Māori iwi of New Zealand.

Te Arawa FM is the radio station of Te Arawa iwi. It was established in the early 1980s and became a charitable entity in November 1990.[3] The station underwent a major transformation in 1993, becoming Whanau FM.[4] One of the station's frequencies was taken over by Mai FM in 1998; the other became Pumanawa FM before later reverting to Te Arawa FM.[5] It is available on 89.0 FM in Rotorua.
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